The 11 Biggest Boat Races In The World


Last Updated on 12/05/2022 by Alfred

If you’re a boating enthusiast or an amateur, check out the top 10 biggest boat races globally!

Around the world, there are numerous boat races, whether in a team or solo, with or without a stopover, transatlantic crossing, or. Hoist the mainsail; Travelvibe offers you the top 10 of the world’s biggest and most famous boat races!

The 11 Biggest Boat Races In The World

1. The Vendée Globe

Considered the largest sailing race worldwide, the Vendée Globe is held alone, without stopover or assistance.

This unmissable French race, created in 1989, takes place every 4 years at the start of Les Sables d’Olonne in the Vendée (where the finish is also made) and brings together the best 60-foot monohull sailboats.

Moreover, the competition is nicknamed “The Everest of the Sea” because of its complexity! It is indeed considered the most difficult of the tests for sailors. 

When we know that the record is 74 days, 3 hours, 35 minutes, and 46 seconds.

2. America’s Cup

A sailing yacht competition since 1851, America’s Cup takes its name from the first winning sailboat, the schooner “America.” Mythical and international in scope, it is one of the oldest sports competitions, and its periodicity is variable (between 3 and 5 years).

During this race, the defender, that is to say, the holder of the cup, puts his title at stake against challengers and is responsible for organizing the regattas as he sees fit.

3. The Route du Rhum

Relatively short (about ten days), this crossing of the Atlantic connects the city of Saint-Malo in Brittany to Pointe-à-Pitre in Guadeloupe.

Created in 1978, this solo sailing race, which follows in the footsteps of old merchant ships, takes place every 4 years. 

His record, set by Francis Joyon during the 2018 edition, is 7 days, 14 hours, 21 minutes, and 47 seconds.

4. The Volvo Ocean Race

Monohulls are once again in the spotlight with the Ocean Race. This crewed round the world trip aboard a sailing boat is carried out every 3 years (since the 2008-2009 edition, replacing every 4 years).

An extreme oceanic marathon that has seen the best sailors compete on the world’s most challenging seas since 1973 is a 45,000-mile-long stage race. 

If his departure is constantly from Alicante, the arrival changes the host city at each edition.

5. The Jules Verne Trophy

The Jules Verne Trophy is a nautical challenge to go around the world (40,300 km) as quickly as possible without stopping or assistance. 

Therefore, the trophy is transmitted only in a new record, currently 40 days, 23 hours, 30 minutes, and 30 seconds.

Therefore, every year since 1993, this crewed sailing race has taken place, starting from Ouessant (Brittany) to Cape Lizard (Great Britain).

6. La Solitaire du Figaro

Far from being an ordinary race, the Solitaire du Figaro has been held every 1970. This solo sailing race is divided into 3 or 4 stages and never follows the same course.

Furthermore, sailors do not choose their boat; they all have the same boat. The race is thus open to amateurs.

7. The Transat Jacques-Vabre

Nicknamed the “coffee route,” this transatlantic race is double (crew of 2 sailors) and connects Le Havre to Brazil.

Organized every 2 years since 1993, it lasts from ten to twenty days on average, even if the event record took only 7 days, 22 hours, and 7 minutes (just that).

8. The Tall Ships Race

It is an international race of sailing schools, where only boats measuring at least 9.14 meters long compete against each other. It takes place mainly in Northern Europe (Atlantic coast, North Sea, and Baltic Sea).

The first race was held in 1956 to foster international friendship and exchange and introduce young sailors to navigation.

9. The Fastnet Race

First held in 1925, this regatta challenges the world’s most fantastic skippers. A crewed, non-stop sailing race is contested every 2 years (in odd-numbered years) between Cowes and Plymouth, England.

This is one of the most dangerous and challenging water races. Indeed, in 1979, no less than 15 sailors lost their lives following disastrous weather conditions.

10. The Admiral’s Cup

Created in 1957, the Admiral’s Cup is an offshore sailboats race. It takes place over 6 rounds and by a team of 3 sailboats.

Unfortunately, since 2005, the race no longer occurs due to a lack of participants. 

However, for some time now, the desire to see the Admiral’s Cup, still one of the most prestigious races at sea, triumphantly return has been felt!

11. The Mini Transat: The Editor’s Choice

A solo and unattended transatlantic race aboard 6.50-meter monohull sailboats, the Mini Transat was created in 1977. 

Every two years (odd-numbered years), this crossing takes place in two stages, departing from France.

Sailors head to the Canary Islands or Madeira for a 10-day stopover before heading to the West Indies.

While this year’s race concludes in Guadeloupe (as it has done many times before), past editions have ended in Antigua, Martinique, and even Salvador de Bahia in Brazil.

￿ Good to know: The Mini Transat is also called the Transat 6.50 or the Mini Transat La Boulangère.

Alfred

Alfred is the author behind the Travelvibe travel blog and is always searching for the quieter, less-visited corners of the world.

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